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Playlist 03.08.20 : Five Songs for the Weekend

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Playlist 03.08.20 : Five Songs for the Weekend
@selkie
Playlist 03.08.20 : Five Songs for the Weekend
@alexandrine_ar
Playlist 03.08.20 : Five Songs for the Weekend
@janicejoostemaa

Mind Enterprises – Mont Blanc

Obsessed with vintage synthesizers and 80s beats, Mind Enterprises aka Andrea Tirone has created a sound which is somehow both forward thinking and nostalgic at the same time.
Think Italo Disco meets retro dance, with razor sharp modern production, and you’re half-way there. The brand new song by Mind Enterprises titled ‘Monogamy’ was released on September 13 via Because Music. The release follows the electronic artist’s recent singles ‘S.H.A.K.E’, ‘Gemini’ and ‘Ballare’, which together with ‘Monogamy’ marks the unveiling an electrifying new sound.

Coupled with its 80s style VHS video, directed by Jack Barraclough, it is designed to make your feet move and your heart long for simpler times. Its irresistible groove and disjointed vocals are as instant as they are idiosyncratic.The video begins with Andrea, playing his alter ego, ‘The Boss’, as he discovers the infidelities of his girlfriend and his personal secretary, and turns out into a twisted and shocking finale.

Hailing from Italy, Andrea Tirone started the Mind Enterprises Moniker back in 2012, based in London and taking inspiration from sources as diverse as the London club scene and Afrofunk. His debut album dropped in 2016.Now based in Gran Canaria, the new Mind Enterprises sound is a natural evolution from his earlier pulsating electronic sounds. The release will be followed by some dancefloor ready remixes. At 1883, we had the opportunity to sit down and chat with Andrea about his latest release “Monogamy”. Production process, career influences, music production techniques, future plans and much more.

Read the rest of this article at: 1883

Chromatics have shared a futuristic new single, ‘Famous Monsters.’ You can listen to the new song below.

‘Famous Monsters’ is the second new song from the band this year, following on from ‘TOY’ which was released back in February. The single came in three different versions: ‘TOY,’ ‘TOY (On Film),’ and ‘TOY (Instrumental).’

Describing that song, Chromatics wrote: “It’s a song about trying to forget someone you’re still in love with even though they treat you like an object. I’m not your TOY.”

Chromatics have shared a futuristic new single, ‘Famous Monsters.’ You can listen to the new song below.

‘Famous Monsters’ is the second new song from the band this year, following on from ‘TOY’ which was released back in February. The single came in three different versions: ‘TOY,’ ‘TOY (On Film),’ and ‘TOY (Instrumental).’

Describing that song, Chromatics wrote: “It’s a song about trying to forget someone you’re still in love with even though they treat you like an object. I’m not your TOY.”

You can watch the video for Chromatics latest, ‘Famous Monsters’ below. The video has been directed by Johnny Jewel.

You can watch the video for Chromatics latest, ‘Famous Monsters’ below. The video has been directed by Johnny Jewel.

The singles follow the surprise release of the band’s album, ‘Closer To Grey’ last year; a deluxe edition of the album is now also available to stream.

The album was the electronic outfit’s first full-length in seven years, following on from 2012’s ‘Kill For Love‘. The album – released via Italians Do It Better – contained 12 tracks including ‘The Sound Of Silence’, ‘Twist The Knife’, and ‘Through The Looking Glass’.

Back in 2018, Chromatics‘ Johnny Jewel surprise released another album, ‘Themes For Television’ to coincide with the one year anniversary of Twin Peaks: The Return.

“I was about a year deep into recording what would become Windswept when I heard that David was making Season three,” said Jewel at the time. “It’s been a year since Chromatics performed at the Roadhouse. With disintegrated memory through the haze of television snow, I wanted to share a glimpse behind the red curtain.”

“The project began as a sonic exploration of the sounds I was hearing in my nightmares. I wanted to find my way out of the maze by focusing on beauty over fear — like the way the fractured sunrise looks in a dream.”

This summer, Chromatics will appear at All Points East and Primavera festival.

Read the rest of this article at NME

Production trio Cubicolor know that anything less than perfection simply won’t do.

That said, the group take it to extremes. Finishing their second album in 2018 the three-piece sat back and listened… and didn’t enjoy it.

So they scrapped it. Working again essentially from scratch, their lucid, colour-laden electronics was constructed anew from the ground up.

They commented: “There were a lot of moments when we weren’t sure we’d ever find what it was we were looking for. On the way we lost friends, lost loves, battled health issues, lost an album, lost each other and came back together again.”

“Looking back now it was pretty crazy but the world keeps spinning and I guess we just didn’t want to put out anything that wasn’t true to ourselves as a band, and the very best we can do as musicians, no matter how long it took.”

The results have been worth waiting for. Cubicolor’s new album ‘Hardly A Day, Hardly A Night’ lands on February 21st, a diverse, colourful, widescreen experience.

Almost painterly in its digital touch, ‘Hardly A Day, Hardly A Night’ will be ushered out into the world by Anjunadeep.

New cut ‘Melodies’ leads the way. A series of tiny digital shards constructed into a vast over-arching structure, ‘Melodies’ seems to refract light in a thousand different ways.

Cubicolor explain:

“We’ve been playing this out for about a year now. We began adding it to our sets on the Rufus du Sol tour and then tweaked it the more shows we played across North America. It was made with on-board sounds from Ableton and played around with on laptops, often in hotel bathrooms, until it felt right. So happy to finally release this one!”

Read the rest of this article at Clash

It seems crazy that it took this long to get a Bad Bunny and Sech collab. “Ignorantes” is a reggaetón romantico Arnold Palmer; Sech’s sweetness perfectly contrasts with the bite of Bad Bunny’s AutoTune croon. The Valentine’s Day ballad is credited to Panamanian producer Dimelo Flow, who was behind Sech’s world-conquering smash “Otro Trago,” and who has become an artist in his own right since signing to Interscope late last year. “Ignorantes” is essentially “Otro Trago pt. II,” only slightly boosting the BPM on the dembow riddim as Bad Bunny and Sech similarly lament a breakup and wallow in self-pity (“La soledad no me asusta, pero dormir solo no me gusta”).

Over a sparse beat bolstered by well-placed hype man harmonies, the duo glosses over fights and dwells on the good times, like wearing your lover’s hoodie post-coitus, or waking up to their kisses. Yet, el conejo malo also sounds downright despondent, and though he may not be known for the sharpest diction, here it seems like he can barely get the words out. As he wails “pero qué rico cuando chingamo,” it’s clear he misses the booty—a lot. “Ignorantes” finds the duo at their most self-reflective; this isn’t either artist’s first song about a failed relationship, but it’s a rare urbano example of shouldering the blame without embracing the shittiness that led to the collapse (“Soy Peor,” anyone?). This newfound self-reflexiveness expressed in the song combined with the music video, a celebratory display of next-level futuristic fits and r and mixed race couples, reminds us that bah boni is a different kind of urbano artist.

Read the rest of this article at Pitchfork

Kelly Lee Owens’ solo work exists in a subaqueous space with layered sound waves that seem to reverberate through liquid. Her self-titled LP exhibited her uncanny ability to depict sound’s physical movement; she sampled a rushing stream in “Arthur” and later featured whale synths on the “Let it Go” b-side “Omen.” On “Melt!,” the first single from her forthcoming LP Inner Song, the track’s physically immersive production samples both the sounds of a melting glacier and people skating on ice, and it completes this submersion with a synth melody that trickles from the top of your head to the tips of your toes.

Owens says she wanted to use organic samples to create something that sounded “hard,” a climate crisis anthem for the club. Plucked from the context of Inner Song, the pounding four-on-the-floor rhythm section on “Melt!” makes for both a club banger and a political comment, a dazzling dance macabre for impending environmental collapse.

Read the rest of this article at Pitchfork

P.S. previous PLAYLISTS & more by P.F.M.