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News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

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News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets
@annstreetstudio via @dana_chels
News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets
@annstreetstudio via @dana_chels
News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets
@annstreetstudio via @dana_chels

State Capture: The Corruption Investigation That Has Shaken South Africa

On 17 January this year, South Africans watched, transfixed, as video from a hidden mobile phone camera was broadcast on TV. It showed a group of men, in corporate uniforms, walking into a vault – where one of them counts out bundles of banknotes: “One, two, three, four, five … bloody Monopoly money,” he laughs through heavy breaths, “must be a million.”

The man’s name is Gavin Watson, and the whistleblowers who put this video into the public domain claim it shows him counting out bribes to be paid to officials in the South African government. They have given accounts that implicate cabinet ministers, senior lawmakers and even the prosecutors tasked with investigating the corrupt practices of Watson’s logistics company, Bosasa. The video is the most dramatic evidence yet of corruption within the ruling African National Congress (ANC).

Read the rest of this article at: The Guardian

News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

Around 9:30 a.m. on June 24 in Manhattan, cyclist Robyn Hightman rounded the corner from 23rd Street onto Sixth Avenue, where they were struck by a large white delivery truck and thrown off their bike into the middle of the street. A photo from shortly after the crash shows a mangled, black, single-speed bicycle lying torn up in the street alongside a flopped open messenger bag, a cracked helmet, and a narrow river of blood.

Hightman, who preferred they/them pronouns, was in the process of moving to New York City from Richmond, Va. when they were hit by the truck. They were sleeping on a friend’s couch in Bushwick and had just started working as a delivery person for Samurai Messenger Service. The day before they were jolted from their bike onto the concrete, they raced on the track at a velodrome in Queens. Hightman had just signed as an ambassador with professional women’s cycling team Hagens Berman—Supermint. Things were looking up.

Officers responded to a 911 call shortly after the crash, and took Hightman to a nearby Bellevue hospital. Hightman was already dead by the time they arrived.

The driver, Antonio Garcia, continued for a few blocks, until someone ran him down and got him to return to the scene. He said he never saw Hightman. The NYPD issued him five citations, all related to truck maintenance, and let him go with a conciliatory pat on the shoulder. Presumably, he went and finished his deliveries.

Read the rest of this article at: Deadspin

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News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

In May Diane Keaton posted a particularly quirky video on her Instagram account that pretty much served as the impetus for this shoot. In it she is descending a stairwell in her 8,000-square-foot Los Angeles home, wearing a checked blazer cinched by a thick black belt, black pants, loosely tied combat boots, and not one but maybe 10 hats stacked on top of each other. “Which hat do you think I should wear?” she asks no one in particular. “No, I’m serious. Because I kinda like… But, seriously, what do you think? Or should I wear them all? Maybe I should just wear all the hats. I think that might be good.” The five-second clip has since accrued 600,000-plus views and nearly 3,500 comments from supportive fans and friends like Michelle Pfeiffer and Candice Bergen.

Of course, over the past several decades, Keaton, forever our Annie Hall, has worn many chapeaus — as an Oscar-winning actress, a prolific author, a style connoisseur, a winemaker, a constant house flipper, and a mom to two (Dexter, 23, and Duke, 18, both of whom she adopted in her 50s).

Read the rest of this article at: InStyle

Let’s start with a couple of stories from the world of sports. This first one, you probably know … The boy’s father could tell something was different. At seven months, he gave his son a putter to fool around with, and the boy dragged it everywhere he went in his little circular baby walker. At 10 months, he climbed down from his high chair, trundled over to a golf club that had been cut down to size for him, and imitated the swing he had been watching in the garage. Because the father couldn’t yet talk with his son, he drew pictures to show the boy how to place his hands on the club.

At two, he went on US television and used a club that was tall enough to reach his shoulder to drive a ball past an admiring Bob Hope. That same year, he entered his first tournament, and won the 10-and-under division. There was no time to waste. By three, the boy was learning how to play out of a sandtrap, and his father was mapping out his destiny. He knew his son had been chosen for this, and that it was his duty to guide him. He started prepping his three-year-old to handle the inevitable media attention that would come. He quizzed the boy, playing the role of reporter, teaching him how to give curt answers, never to offer more than precisely what was asked.

When the boy was four, his father could drop him off at a golf course at nine in the morning and pick him up eight hours later, sometimes with the money he had won from those foolish enough to doubt him.

At eight, the son beat his father for the first time. The father didn’t mind, because he was convinced that his boy was singularly talented, and that he was uniquely equipped to help him. He had been an outstanding athlete himself, and against enormous odds. He played baseball in college when he was the only black player in the entire conference. He understood people, and discipline; a sociology major, he served in Vietnam as a member of the army’s elite Green Berets, and later taught psychological warfare to future officers. He knew he hadn’t done his best with three kids from a previous marriage, but now he could see that he had been given a second chance to do the right thing with number four. And it was all going according to plan.

Read the rest of this article at: The Guardian

A Toast to When Harry Met Sally…, a Romantic Comedy for Grown-Ups

News 07.12.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

My first memory of When Harry Met Sally… is that I wasn’t allowed to watch it. When I think about the film now, I see it as a romance—an inverted one, where love does not come until 12 years after first sight, but a love story nonetheless. But When Harry Met Sally…’s unwholesome raciness—the faked orgasm, the f-bombs, the woman who meows in the throes of passion—featured prominently in the film’s marketing campaign. So did the film’s central, provocative, deeply heteronormative question: Can men and women ever “just” be friends? And it needed an R rating to answer that question, too! The film glowed with forbidden allure.

My parents held the common, irrational conviction that watching sexuality was much worse than watching violence. I somehow saw The Killing Fields before I watched When Harry Met Sally…; if you can’t guess from the title, The Killing Fields is a harrowing movie about genocide in Cambodia.

So what I first learned about When Harry Met Sally…, besides its cast, was that Meg Ryan fakes an orgasm in the movie. Someone had to explain the joke to me after an assembly in which a visiting lecturer made a joke about having a When Harry Met Sally… moment to an auditorium full of middle schoolers. (No one laughed.) I wasn’t entirely sure what an orgasm was, let alone how to fake one. But it seemed like a power move.

Read the rest of this article at: Vanity Fair

P.S. previous articles & more by P.F.M.

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