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Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

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Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

Getting Serious About Getting Fit: A discussion on work & physical fitness, and finding balance between the two . . .

Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit
Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit
Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit
Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

“There is only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that’s your own self.” —Aldous Huxley

Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

Interior Inspiration: The gold shelves at Tracy Anderson’s Brentwood, Los Angeles fitness studio, designed by Windsor Smith.

Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit
Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

June 6 marked the one year anniversary of when I first began working out three times a week, every week. Quite an achievement, given that my relationship with physical fitness of any kind has always been a difficult one, having always been slight with little or no effort. There is a thought in our circles that you are either in business or you’re fit — said, of course, in jest — but the sub-text is that keeping fit takes an enormous amount of time and energy, and if you are running a successful business, you most likely do not have the time and energy that it takes to sculpt a perfect body. And perhaps there may be some truth to that.

I adore working (a little too much at times, perhaps), and when we began running TIG full-time, I happily threw myself into the work, simply because I loved it so, and love it still. However, all the long hours and late nights at the office lead to a somewhat sedentary lifestyle, which in turn lead to weight gain—a little at a time, nearly imperceptible, until one day, I no longer felt like myself . . .

With the start of many long walks and climbs up Arthur’s Seat and bicycle rides along the coast in a new city, the weight began falling off, and I began thinking that perhaps it was time to find a compromise between working & working out, and that the two need not be mutually exclusive, but rather, that the working out could actually help with the work (energy, creativity, etc.). Since then, I have been training at the gym (with the help of someone who knows what he is doing) three times a week for a little over a year now, and have never looked back.

Our workouts involve strength training (working with weights), and phrases like progressive overload (gradually increasing the stress placed upon the body during training to continuously increase the demands on the muscoloskeletal system in order to gain strength and endurance), Bulgarian Squats with weights, and Dead Lifts, (among other rather ambitious things), and a lot of hard work.

I still work too much, but I also take as much time off as I like, whenever I like (we recently took a four-day trip to Ibiza, left) and more importantly, I now make time for fitness and I look and feel like myself again, only stronger, which may be the best achievement of all.

Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

“Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity. ” —John F. Kennedy

Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

THIS & THAT

From the The Is Glamorous Instagram, raspberry & coconut smoothie bowls for breakfast. Here’s a Mango Açai Smoothie Bowl Recipe, and find more recipes here.

 

 

 

Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit
Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit
Health & Beauty: Getting Serious About Getting Fit

Playlist 09.15.19 : Five Songs for the Weekend

“Cool To You” is the third release of this year from Taylor Van Ginkel’s solo project, Teenage Priest. Written and produced by the Los Angeles artist, he expresses the struggle of wanting to be perceived as cool, despite straying from his internal desires.

News 09.13.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

One of the most radical and important ideas in the history of physics came from an unknown graduate student who wrote only one paper, got into arguments with physicists across the Atlantic as well as his own advisor, and left academia after graduating without even applying for a job as a professor. Hugh Everett’s story is one of many fascinating tales that add up to the astonishing history of quantum mechanics, the most fundamental physical theory we know of.

Trend: Curvy and Voluptuous Furniture Designs & Proportions

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The Best Anti-Pollution Skincare Products for City Pollution & Digital Ageing

Summer holidays is the best skincare that could possibly exist―not only are our bodies are more relaxed and rested, but spending these summer days with bare skin without any makeup (at least in my case) gets me to my best complexion.

News 09.11.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

“There is infinite hope,” Kafka tells us, “only not for us.” This is a fittingly mystical epigram from a writer whose characters strive for ostensibly reachable goals and, tragically or amusingly, never manage to get any closer to them. But it seems to me, in our rapidly darkening world, that the converse of Kafka’s quip is equally true: There is no hope, except for us.

Notes from the Weekend & a Few Lovely Links

WE SPENT MOST of the last week in Edinburgh on business, and have also been slowly emptying out the contents of our storage unit there, which means for the most part of the past few days, have been buried under an avalanche of old photographs and letters, and even came across a diary by my fourteen-year-old self. It’s been strange and exhausting living in the past, but it has also been an exercise in deciding what to keep and what to leave behind, what’s really important and what I really can’t live without.