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In the News 04.02.15 : Today’s Articles of Interest from around the Internets

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In the News 04.02.15 : Today’s Articles of Interest from around the Internets

1. Behind The Mask

“Brain injuries caused by blast events change soldiers in ways many can’t articulate. Some use art therapy, creating painted masks to express how they feel.”

 

Read the rest of this article at National Geographic

 


 

2. Why It’s Good To Be Wrong

“That our senses often fail us is a truism; and our self-critical culture has long ago made us familiar with the fact that we can make mistakes of reasoning too. But the type of fallibility that I want to discuss here would be all-pervasive even if our senses were as sharp as the Hubble Telescope and our minds were as logical as a computer. It arises from the way in which our ideas about reality connect with reality itself—how, in other words, we can create knowledge, and how we can fail to.”

 
Read the rest of this article at Nautilus

 


 

3. Chipotle: The Definitive Oral History

“By restaurant industry standards, Chipotle Mexican Grill does countless things wrong. Its outlets aren’t in the busiest locations. It spends too much money on food. It doesn’t serve breakfast; it doesn’t do drive-throughs, franchises, or even much in the way of advertising. It almost never adds anything new to its menu. Employees still cut all the tomatoes — hundreds of thousands of pounds a day — by hand. It is, in so many ways, the anti-McDonald’s.”

 
Read the rest of this article at Bloomberg Business

 


 

4. The Long, Strange Purgatory of Casey Kasem

He was America’s most beloved deejay, the unmistakable voice who created ‘American top 40’ and rose to fame on the schmaltzy but irresistible charm of his “long-distance dedications” all of which makes the tabloid circumstances of his demise—an epic family feud waged in streets, courtrooms, and funeral homes from L.A. to Oslo—even more surreal. Amy Wallace investigates the tragic final days (and very weird afterlife) of a radio legend.

 
Read the rest of this article at GQ

 


 

5. The Trip Treatment

“Between 1953 and 1973, the federal government spent four million dollars to fund a hundred and sixteen studies of LSD, involving more than seventeen hundred subjects. (These figures don’t include classified research.) Through the mid-nineteen-sixties, psilocybin and LSD were legal and remarkably easy to obtain. Sandoz, the Swiss chemical company where, in 1938, Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD, gave away large quantities of Delysid—LSD—to any researcher who requested it, in the hope that someone would discover a marketable application. Psychedelics were tested on alcoholics, people struggling with obsessive-compulsive disorder, depressives, autistic children, schizophrenics, terminal cancer patients, and convicts, as well as on perfectly healthy artists and scientists (to study creativity) and divinity students (to study spirituality). The results reported were frequently positive. But many of the studies were, by modern standards, poorly designed and seldom well controlled, if at all. When there were controls, it was difficult to blind the researchers—that is, hide from them which volunteers had taken the actual drug. (This remains a problem.)”

 
Read the rest of this article at The New Yorker

 


P.S. previous articles & more by P.F.M.

 

 

[images : one // two // three // four // five]

 
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